Sessions

1: Analytical Electron Microscopy

Chairperson

Aleksandra Czyrska-Filemonowicz
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

Analytical electron microscopy gathers simultaneously information about morphology, microstructure, crystallography and chemical composition of materials, interfaces, layers and nanophases with a spatial resolution down to the atomic level. Nanoprobe diffraction and holography become now efficient ways for strain analysis at the nanometer level. STEM-HAADF, ADF and – more recently – DPC (differential phase contrast) bring maps of atom columns with quantitative contrasts for light or heavy elements. Based on inelastic interactions electron dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy EELS are straightforward methods to measure chemical compositions, binding states, valences and electronic levels with recent progress extending analysis toward light spectroscopy. Tilting sample or focus sectioning tomography and quantitative analysis of HRSTEM images extend investigations to the 3rd dimension.
The session focuses on the scientific achievements regarding instrumentation, methods, data analysis and application of analytical electron microscopy. Novel research related to the topics mentioned above, but not only limited to, are welcome to this session.

Invited speakers

Philippe A. Buffat (Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland)

 

2: SEM/STEM imaging

Chairperson

Tomasz Płociński
Warsaw, PL

Description of the session

Electron Microscopy techniques which are based on the beam scanning including Scanning Electron Microscopy, Focused Ion Beam and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy are very often used for the materials structure imaging. Capability to collecting signals with many detectors simultaneously is one of the advantage of these techniques. According to the type and location of the detector as well as the microscope parameters, the different contrast can be obtained. The specific design and development of the new microscopes is very promising for researchers, because these modern instruments can generate unique information’s. At the same time, it became more complicated for the users to recognize the capabilities of the microscopes made by different companies. The main aim of this this session is to present possibilities and examples representative for each techniques. The examples related to imaging with SEM/FIB/STEM microscopes like observations at low voltages in SEM, unique contrast acquisition with specific detectors, results comparison obtained from different microscopes and any other imaging examples are very welcome.

Invited speaker

Quentin Ramasse (SuperSTEM – The National Facility for Aberration Corrected STEM, Daresbury, UK)

 

3: HRTEM

Chairpersons

Sławomir Kret, Piotr Dłużewski
Warsaw, PL

Description of the session

The session is devoted to the characterization of the solid state materials with the use of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy combined with other research methods. The following topics will be included:
– Application of HRTEM imaging techniques for nanomaterials characterization.
– Advance methods for HRTEM images simulations,
– Investigation of crystal lattice distortions using HRTEM in conjunction with other techniques like DFT or GPA.
– Development experimental methods for HRTEM/STEM imaging

Invited speakers

Christoph T. Koch (Humboldt University of Berlin, Department of Physics, Berlin, Germany)

 

4: 3D Imaging

Chairperson

Adam Kruk
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

The aim of this session is to cover the broad range of techniques that are currently used in multidimensional imaging of structural elements in material sciences. This session is dedicated to advanced techniques including new imaging modes in tomography, new algorithms for quantitative and accurate reconstructions. 3D imaging session will include applications of tomographic reconstruction methods to achieve 3D volume representations of materials, and furthermore include non-tomographic 3D techniques, whether based on diffraction, low-depth of focus, or various slicing schemes. The session extends over all radiations and instrumentations with a focus on nanoscale resolutions. An example of these applications can be: electron microscopy-, focused-ion beam-, field-ion atom probe- and X-ray/synchrotron tomographic techniques.

Invited speakers

Juan Carlos Hernández Garrido (Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, Puerto Real (Cadiz), Spain)

Urszula Stachewicz (AGH University of Science and Technology, International Centre of Electron Microscopy for Materials Science, Poland )

 

5: In-situ microscopy

Chairperson

Jerzy Morgiel
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

In-situ observations opens a unique possibility to follow the processes of phase transformation or just microstructure evolution from the first stages till the very end. The above processes are routinely started either by temperature changes realized using cooling /heating holders or by subjecting thin foils to stretching forces using straining holders. The access to this valued knowledge was usually weighted by loss of resolution caused by image drift, problems with recording capability (at times when films were still in use) or sample shape (mechanical testing performed on thicker samples called for higher voltage microscopes). Nowadays, progress in in-situ observations stems both from probing new possibilities (including environmental cells, nano- hardness testing) and greatly improved capabilities of microscopes (dedicated cameras allowing to record movies, holders allowing to program the time-temperature sequences, etc). Hosting separate session on in-situ microscopy should give opportunity to present interesting findings from material research field obtained with these established techniques as well as to present new solutions in these areas.

Invited speakers

Eva Olsson (Chalmers University, Sweden)

 

6: Orientation mapping

Chairpersons

Marek Faryna, Krzysztof Sztwiertnia
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, phase identification and distribution to be determined either from bulk or thin foils of polycrystalline materials. The former can be achieved when a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is employed, the latter when transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used. Recently, a novel technique based on orientation mapping of electron transparent TEM specimen analysed in the SEM known as transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) is rapidly developed. Also a wide range of in-situ heating and tensile experiments for EBSD applications provides insight into the role of crystallographic orientation in the dynamic evolution of microstructure. The session will be dedicated to a whole range of orientation microscopy techniques mentioned above.

Invited speakers

Nathalie Bozzolo (Centre de Mise en Forme de Matériaux  CEMEF – MINES ParisTech, CNRS, France)

Ali Gholinia (University of Manchester, UK)

 

7: Electron Crystallography

Chairpersons

Elżbieta Jezierska
Warsaw, PL

Danuta Stróż
Katowice, PL

Description of the sesion

The importance of the CBED method rapidly gained recognition in the electron microscopy community because of crystal point-groups and space-groups determination, thickness measurements. Microdiffraction is very useful in precise crystal structure characterization even for nanocrystals, the large angle technique in 3D symmetry determination and lattice-defect identification for larger grains. The Large-Angle Convergent-Beam Electron Diffraction (LACBED) technique was proposed by Tanaka in 1980 to improve the quality of the CBED patterns obtained with a large angle convergent incident beam (Kossel patterns). In this method a specimen is raised (or lowered) from its usual eucentric position in the object plane. The LACBED technique which uses a defocus incident beam has a unique property: the image of the illuminated area of the specimen is superimposed on the diffraction pattern composed of Bragg lines. Therefore, the pattern is a mapping between the direct and the reciprocal spaces and “shadow image” of a defect is visible on the pattern. Conventional selected area diffraction allowing us to perform advanced structural characterization assisted with image simulations and quantitative analysis. The additional aspect of electron diffraction is just the beauty of perfect patterns.

Invited speakers

János Lábár ( Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, Hungary)

 

8: Electron Microscopy in Materials Science

Chairpersons

Małgorzata Lewandowska
Warsaw, PL

Leszek Kępiński
Wroclaw, PL

Description of the session

Electron microscopy has became an indispensable tool in materials science. It allows studies on the mechanisms of basic phenomena in bulk materials (e.g., plastic deformation, precipitation, diffusion) and enables complete characterization of nanoscale objects thanks to atomic scale visualization of the real structure. This session will focus on the practical use of electron microscopy techniques (both scanning and transmission) to characterize materials and comprehend the microstructure – property relationships. The contributions concerning all types of crystalline and disordered materials (metals, ceramics, polymers and composites) in the form of bulk phases, surfaces, thin films and powders (including nanopowders) are welcome.

Invited speakers

Alicja Bachmatiuk (Wrocławskie Centrum Badań EIT+, PL)

Kenji Matsuda (University of Toyama, Japan)

 

 9: Electron Microscopy in Chemistry and Life Science

Chairpersons

Zbigniew Sojka, Grzegorz Tylko
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

The session focuses on current state and development of microscopic techniques in the field of chemistry and life sciences. Recent progress in instrumentation, imaging methodology and development of widely available software for advanced data processing and analysis, make electron microscopy one of the most powerful research methods for structure studies in these research areas.
Application of electron microscopy in chemistry is mostly related to heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, solid state chemistry. Direct characterization of materials of interest by SEM and S/TEM imaging, electron diffraction and spectroscopic measurements (EDS, EELS), corroborated first principles calculations, provide unique approach for advanced investigations into the structure, shape and size dependent properties, relevant for their functionalities and reactivity. Since many of typical samples are in the form of powders and morphologically involved nanostructures, one of the main goals of this session is to discuss how to customize the currently available microscopic techniques for reliable analysis of such specimens in the nano- and pico-scales.
In the field of life science, the electron microscopy (EM) is still the most popular method to image the ultrastructure of cells and tissues derived from plants and animals as well as whole organisms. It helps to diagnose pathologies of human tissues on the basis of their structural changes. SEM/TEM observations together with X-ray microanalysis defines concentrations and distributions of elements. Localization of structural components of cell organelles are possible thanks to well-developed cryo-preparation and immunolabeling approaches. Combined with other microscopies, EM enables precise definition of relationships between cellular compartments at nanoscale (Correlative Microscopy). Development of electron tomography made 3D imaging possible at subcellular level and lead to structural definition of main parts of cellular machinery. Such broad applicability of EM in biological sciences should create the forum to discuss merits of particular EM technique and problems related to sample preparation and imaging.

Invited speaker

Sebastian Glatt, (Max Planck Research Group, Jagiellonian University, PL)

 

10: Young Scientist Session

Chairpersons

Maria Sozańska
Gliwice, PL

Beata Dubiel
Cracow, PL

Description of the session

This session will provide an opportunity for young scientists to give oral presentation of their achievements and to establish a supportive community with other researchers. We cordially invite PhD students and young scientists below 35 years old to participate in this session. During this session the winners of the PTMi awards for the best PhD contribution will present their research in front of the EM2017 audience.